Payment funding – Agapes GR http://agapesgr.org/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 14:32:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://agapesgr.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T194407.031-150x150.png Payment funding – Agapes GR http://agapesgr.org/ 32 32 Majority of Hungarians think Brussels should pay EU funds withheld https://agapesgr.org/majority-of-hungarians-think-brussels-should-pay-eu-funds-withheld/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 11:59:06 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/majority-of-hungarians-think-brussels-should-pay-eu-funds-withheld/ Six in ten Hungarians would like Brussels to stop withholding EU funds owed to Hungary, according to a survey by the Nézőpont Institute, a pro-government think tank. One in three opposition voters, and even a majority of young people, think Hungary should get back the money withheld for two years, according to a Hungarian news […]]]>

Six in ten Hungarians would like Brussels to stop withholding EU funds owed to Hungary, according to a survey by the Nézőpont Institute, a pro-government think tank. One in three opposition voters, and even a majority of young people, think Hungary should get back the money withheld for two years, according to a Hungarian news site Origo reports.

The Nézőpont Institute conducted a representative survey of 1,000 Hungarian participants to find out what they think about the withholding of EU funds. The Hungarian government is constantly negotiating with the European Union in order to reach an agreement on the funds. The government has taken a number of steps to meet the European Commission’s conditions, such as establishing the Integrity Authority and strengthening the asset declaration system. However, the expected funds have still not arrived in Hungary, which the country and its economy desperately need.

The institute asked people if they agreed with the “suspension of European Union financial aid to Hungary”. The vast majority of respondents, 59%, said no, and only 33% said they agreed with the Brussels procedure.

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Of particular interest, the pro-government think tank also polled opposition voters who were divided on the issue.

While opposition parties generally support financial sanctions against Hungary, the survey found that 31% of opposition voters oppose the withholding of EU funds.

Even among citizens between the ages of 18 and 29, who are generally seen as critical of the government, and those with higher education, 50% of respondents oppose further withholding of funds from the EU. Overall, there is no group in Hungarian society where an absolute majority would agree that, in the current situation, Hungary should not have access to EU funds.

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Featured photo via Pixabay

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investors: very short-term liquid funds are sought after because banks pay much less https://agapesgr.org/investors-very-short-term-liquid-funds-are-sought-after-because-banks-pay-much-less/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 00:39:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/investors-very-short-term-liquid-funds-are-sought-after-because-banks-pay-much-less/ Mumbai: Retail investors are gradually shifting their money towards liquid and very short-term funds where they can earn up to 6-6.5% after a series of rate hikes since the start of the summer. “After two years, we are now asking bond investors to move money into very short-term, liquid funds because banks have not followed […]]]>
Mumbai: Retail investors are gradually shifting their money towards liquid and very short-term funds where they can earn up to 6-6.5% after a series of rate hikes since the start of the summer.

“After two years, we are now asking bond investors to move money into very short-term, liquid funds because banks have not followed the rate hikes,” said Anup Maheshwari, founder of Money Mantra, a distributor of mutual funds.

Mutual fund investors had shunned debt funds as rising interest rates and volatility led to low returns in debt funds, with investors earning only 2-3% in cash.



However, most banks did not raise savings account rates at all and raised fixed deposit rates only marginally. This has made investing in these products unattractive now, retailers point out. SBI savings bank balances only gain 2.7% and HDFC bank balances gain 3%. Short-term deposits of 45 days to 179 days in SBI earn 4%, while in HDFC Bank they earn 4.5%. In comparison, an investment in a liquid fund or an ultra-short-term fund can yield between 6% and 6.5%.

Fund managers believe that liquidity should remain tight, which means that short-term rates should remain high in the short term.

“Cash withdrawals typically increase in the second half of the fiscal year. With a high trade deficit, RBI’s currency selling may also continue. Thus, liquidity conditions are expected to tighten further in the coming months, which would keep short-term rates high,” said Pankaj Pathak, fund manager (fixed income), Quantum Mutual Fund.

Financial planners suggest investors use very short-term, liquid funds for balances ranging from 7 days to 6 months. Most funds accept amounts as low as ₹500 as a lump sum contribution. Once investors make a redemption request before the cut-off time, they get the money back the next day. Very short-term funds invest their money in debt securities and money market instruments where the duration of the portfolio is between 3 and 6 months and where volatility is low and the possibility of a loss in market value, if investors come with a 3 month horizon.

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Businesses: don’t make us pay for the waste of the state with funds for the unemployed | New https://agapesgr.org/businesses-dont-make-us-pay-for-the-waste-of-the-state-with-funds-for-the-unemployed-new/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 02:41:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/businesses-dont-make-us-pay-for-the-waste-of-the-state-with-funds-for-the-unemployed-new/ ALBANY – Business advocates are calling on the state to return unemployment insurance rates to pre-pandemic levels after an audit determined that fraud and lax state Department of Labor oversight have led to $11 billion in losses for the fund that pays out unemployment benefits. The National Federation of Independent Businesses, a group representing small […]]]>

ALBANY – Business advocates are calling on the state to return unemployment insurance rates to pre-pandemic levels after an audit determined that fraud and lax state Department of Labor oversight have led to $11 billion in losses for the fund that pays out unemployment benefits.

The National Federation of Independent Businesses, a group representing small business owners, says the best response to the successful audit of State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli’s office would be for the state to reimburse businesses tens of millions of dollars additional costs that companies had to pay. after the exhaustion of the unemployment fund.

New York and other states have seen an increase in jobless claims after the COVID-19 contagion triggered restrictions on businesses starting in March 2020.

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The state ended up borrowing nearly $10 billion from the federal government to meet its unemployment benefit obligations.

The state has rebuilt the unemployment insurance fund by imposing higher costs for unemployment insurance on businesses and setting a fee this fall of $27.60 per employee.

Ashley Ranslow, state director of the NFIB, said New York small businesses with an average of 10 employees saw their unemployment insurance rates increase by a total of $4,000 for the years 2021 and 2022, and that is before the $27.60 per worker assessment is added to the calculation.

The average annual rate increase per employee has been about $200, though there are variables in those calculations for specific companies, she noted.

“For a small business, that’s a lot of money,” Ranslow said.

AMERICAN RESCUE PLAN FUND

His group tried to persuade lawmakers and the Hochul administration to replenish unemployment insurance money absorbed by fraudulent claims approved by state labor bureaucrats by dipping into federal funds from the U.S. bailout received by the state from the federal treasury.

She noted that the DiNapoli report highlighted the fact that the total scale of the fraud could have exceeded $11 billion, but auditors were limited in their search by the employment agency’s inability to cooperate. fully with their investigation.

Several Republican lawmakers as well as Assemblyman Billy Jones, D-Chateaugay Lake, have called on the state to pay the interest on its loan from the federal government to prevent employers from grappling with this element of the additional costs resulting higher unemployment insurance contributions.

Ranslow argues that it is fundamentally unfair for the state to impose costs on employers when the Department of Labor was warned in 2015 to improve its oversight of the unemployment insurance fund, but, according to the audit, did not respond to this request.

STATE SYSTEMS ASSESSMENT

One of DiNapoli’s recommendations was for the state to update its unemployment claims processing technology. In addition to the massive fraud, the unemployment fund was inundated with claims, leaving thousands of benefit claimants to wait months while their documents were reviewed.

R-Otsego County Sen. Peter Oberacker said he drafted legislation that would require a full forensic assessment of the state’s IT infrastructure, including the unemployment benefits system.

Some Republicans said they were disappointed the audit was released a day after Election Day, a time that spared Gov. Kathy Hochul the embarrassment if voters had known about the fraud before they turned out. go to the polls. The state labor commissioner is appointed by former Governor Andrew Cuomo and was kept in place by Hochul.

A DiNapoli spokeswoman, Jennifer Freeman, said the audit was released when it was ready for distribution.

“As we noted repeatedly in the report, the DOL (Department of Labor) was uncooperative with our staff and caused multiple delays in our efforts to complete this audit,” Freeman said in response to questions. questions from CNHI. “Those trying to politicize the audit should focus their energy on fixing the problems we uncovered and recovering improper payments.”

When asked if the audit would be referred to a law enforcement agency, Freeman replied, “No specific reference was made regarding this audit. The auditors did not examine granular data or specific cases. As indicated in the audit, this information was not provided by the agency.

When asked if the comptroller’s office would pursue follow-up actions on its own, Freeman replied, “When widespread issues are identified, our office typically conducts a follow-up audit to determine if the state agency acted on our recommendations. With regard to the recovery of funds, this was one of the recommendations of the audit with which the DOL agreed. Our office also met with federal DOL (and) OIG (Office of the Inspector General) officials on the issues identified.

In response to the audit, the Department of Labor said it was halfway through an effort to modernize its systems and was strengthening its fraud investigation resources.

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Prince George school board president’s payment of legal fees questioned https://agapesgr.org/prince-george-school-board-presidents-payment-of-legal-fees-questioned/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 04:04:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/prince-george-school-board-presidents-payment-of-legal-fees-questioned/ Comment this story Comment Edward Burroughs III, a county council member and former school board member, has asked the attorney and state inspector general of Maryland to investigate school funds used to pay attorney fees of Prince George School Board President Juanita Miller to remain on the board. The county school board uncovered the expenses […]]]>

Comment

Edward Burroughs III, a county council member and former school board member, has asked the attorney and state inspector general of Maryland to investigate school funds used to pay attorney fees of Prince George School Board President Juanita Miller to remain on the board.

The county school board uncovered the expenses last week after bills were discovered showing fees paid to Miller’s attorneys who fought her with the state board of education for misconduct in office, neglect of duty and incompetence. Members of the Prince George School Board said they were unaware of the payments and disapproved of them.

The invoices, first reported by Fox 5 and obtained by The Post, show that at least $32,280 in school funds were directed to MarcusBonsib LLC – the law firm representing Miller, and appear to have been approved by the Vice-Chairman Sonya. Williams. One of the invoices is initialed “SW” with “OK to pay” written by it.

Miller did not comment on payments for the legal fees. In a message on Friday, Miller said she had been busy working during early voting and Election Day, but would “likely release a statement” now with more flexibility in her schedule. His attorney did not respond to a request for comment.

“There is a lot of information that has not been shared, and so if the media investigated it, they would find out the information,” he added. Williams said in an interview at Thursday’s meeting. “But because it’s a legal matter, I’m not privy to discuss it.” She declined to answer further questions about the bills.

Alsobrooks Calls on Prof. George’s Board of Education Chairman Miller to Resign

Burroughs’ letter to state investigators, dated Nov. 4, said that Miller and Williams’ apparent actions were “a clear violation” of a board policy that prohibits conduct considered fraud, waste or abuse. The policy defines fraud as “all acts for personal gain, without limitation” and mentions “unauthorized signing of documents” or “invoices”. He also cited another board policy prohibiting board members from taking action on behalf of the board unless formally approved by the board.

“The apparent embezzlement of tens of thousands of taxpayer funds” must be investigated, Burroughs wrote, and if proven, “those responsible must be held accountable and taxpayer funds reimbursed.” .

The district attorney and the education inspector general did not respond to requests for comment on Friday.

The board does not have a policy that prevents it from covering members’ legal fees, said Meghan Gebreselassie, a spokesperson for the school system. The school board has submitted all required documents and clearances to process an invoice, Gebreselassie wrote in an email Friday. “It’s strictly a matter of the Board of Education and not an administrative matter,” she said.

School board members discussed Miller’s legal fee payments privately during Thursday night’s board meeting, two people with direct knowledge of the meeting said. The people, who declined to be named because the action took place behind closed doors, said discussions over payments were ongoing. The issue was not discussed publicly at Thursday’s meeting, although some board members argued it should have been.

The charges brought by the Maryland State Board of Education against Miller in May stem in part from a complaint against her alleging misconduct by a group of current and former board members. Miller also declined a request to resign from her seat by County Executive Angela Alsobrooks, who named Miller chair of the board last year.

A hearing is scheduled for Nov. 28 regarding the charges brought against Miller by the state Board of Education. The ongoing legal fight could drag on until at least Dec. 21, when new state legislation is expected to go into effect, allowing the county school board to choose its own leaders.

Thursday’s meeting was the last for Williams, who did not seek re-election this year.

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Increased funding allocation agreed for Inverness Region Winter Payment Scheme https://agapesgr.org/increased-funding-allocation-agreed-for-inverness-region-winter-payment-scheme/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 10:17:10 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/increased-funding-allocation-agreed-for-inverness-region-winter-payment-scheme/ Members of the Highland Council’s Inverness City Area Committee have agreed to increase the Winter Discretionary Payments Scheme for eligible people in the Inverness area for 2022/23. Funds available through the Inverness Common Good Fund have been used to help those most in need heat their homes this winter in the Inverness area. Previously, a […]]]>

Members of the Highland Council’s Inverness City Area Committee have agreed to increase the Winter Discretionary Payments Scheme for eligible people in the Inverness area for 2022/23.

Funds available through the Inverness Common Good Fund have been used to help those most in need heat their homes this winter in the Inverness area.

Previously, a one-time payment of £97 per household was agreed to support those most in need of financial assistance during the colder months at a time when the cost of energy is soaring. This figure has now been increased to £150 per eligible person for the winter of 2022/23, as Inverness City Area Committee members agreed today (4 November 2022) to reallocate available funds from the Inverness Common Good Fund to the Inverness Region. Winter Payment Scheme.

Councilor Ian Brown, Leader of Inverness and Region, said: “Increasing the winter payment to £150 for those eligible will have a positive impact on people in financial difficulty and also on people receiving benefits. disability benefits, which are also more likely to be negatively affected by increases in the cost of living.

“The Winter Payments Scheme for Inverness and Region, funded by the Inverness Common Good Fund, is now entering its eighth year. The members approved of this increase, as we have never seen financial situations as difficult and difficult as the ones we are facing this winter. This payment, along with other financial support programs, will serve as a lifeline for many people.

“The fuel and cost of living crisis we are currently living in is unprecedented and demonstrates the key role the Inverness Common Good Funded scheme is playing in helping those who need it most to heat their homes.”

The Inverness Winter Payments Scheme is fully funded by the Inverness Common Fund and is therefore only available to eligible people in the 7 specified Inverness wards. Funding for the Common Good of Inverness may only be used to primarily benefit people living within the geographic area of ​​the former burgh of Inverness.

New applications for this year’s program will be accepted from December 1, 2022 to February 28, 2023 (inclusive). The Board will undertake further promotion for Inverness’ 2022/23 Winter Discretionary Payments Scheme in due course.

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Health budget raided to fund pay deals as John Swinney plans £1.2bn cuts https://agapesgr.org/health-budget-raided-to-fund-pay-deals-as-john-swinney-plans-1-2bn-cuts/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 08:40:44 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/health-budget-raided-to-fund-pay-deals-as-john-swinney-plans-1-2bn-cuts/ Health budget cuts worth £400m come ahead of a hugely difficult winter for the NHS, which continues to come under pressure under the strain of the pandemic, faces threats of a widespread strike among health service workers and displayed record performance in accident and emergency services. Presenting the outcome of the long-awaited emergency budget review, […]]]>

Health budget cuts worth £400m come ahead of a hugely difficult winter for the NHS, which continues to come under pressure under the strain of the pandemic, faces threats of a widespread strike among health service workers and displayed record performance in accident and emergency services.

Presenting the outcome of the long-awaited emergency budget review, John Swinney announced a further cut of £615m on top of the £560m announced in September. The in-year budget review was due to take place within two weeks of the ‘mini-budget’ in Westminster, which ultimately cost Liz Truss his job as Prime Minister, but was twice delayed until Wednesday . The statement from the finance secretary, who replaces Kate Forbes during her maternity leave, means that £1.2billion has been cut from the Scottish budget in two months.

The Deputy Prime Minister blamed the UK government’s “serious financial mismanagement” for the cuts, saying “calamity is giving way to austerity” ahead of the UK government’s autumn statement on November 17. He also pointed to the “extraordinary pressures of inflation” which he said had forced the government’s hand.

Mr Swinney told MSPs: ‘I have to balance the books, but I am committed to doing so in a way that prioritizes funding to help families, support businesses, provide fair wage rewards and protect the delivery of public services. These are not decisions we would like to make, but in the absence of additional funding from the UK government, these are decisions we are forced to make. They secure a path to a balanced budget, while prioritizing fair wage offers in the public sector and recognizing that this is essential for the delivery of key public services. »

The Deputy First Minister also confirmed that further cuts to the budget during the year may be needed if the UK Government’s Autumn Statement leads to a reduction in overall funding for Scottish Government grants due to spending cuts to the Westminster level. A year-end budget process called Supplementary Estimates could also result in additional costs or extra funding for the Scottish Treasury.

The £400m health budget reprioritization includes £116m in cuts to Covid-19 spending on vaccination, test and protect and PPE, plus £70m from social care and the development of the much-criticized National Care Service plans. An additional £65million was taken from primary care services, including delays to community optometry and audiology services, with a further cut of £63million from the Scottish Trauma Network and health programs improvement.

Scottish Labor health spokeswoman Jackie Baillie called the cuts “downright dangerous” for a health service “on the brink of disaster”. She said: “A deadly winter crisis is looming and the looting of frontline essential service budgets will cost lives. The SNP says it’s about ‘reprioritising’ budgets to pay NHS staff, but the pay is recurring year after year so these are clearly cuts. NHS staff and patients cannot be made to pay the price for the economic vandalism of the SNP and the Tories. The SNP must rethink these reckless plans.

Deputy First Minister John Swinney delivers a budget statement to the Scottish Parliament in Holyrood, Edinburgh

The Scottish Liberal Democrats have also highlighted the £38million cut to mental health services, with party leader Alex Cole-Hamilton calling the move “demonstrably wrong”. Mr Swinney said resources within mental health would no longer be growing as “rapidly as we had anticipated”, but would continue to grow.

Liz Smith, the finance spokeswoman for the Scottish Conservatives, tried to deflect blame from the UK government. She called on the Scottish Government to support “the priorities of Scottish households rather than our own pet projects”. The MSP also called on the government to abandon plans for a national care service because of the financial implications and to look to the constitutional budget for further savings.

She said: “The current difficult circumstances do not absolve the Deputy First Minister or his colleagues of responsibility for the position Scotland finds itself in after 15 years of government.

“These drastic cuts to SNP spending on NHS frontline services will only put the lives of more patients on the line. Our health service is already on its knees and heroic patients and staff face the prospect of a truly catastrophic winter.

Other areas affected by the spending cuts include £30m of capital spending on higher education construction projects, £10m related to the rollout of digital devices in school and £16m sterling around the R100 ultra-fast broadband scheme. A total of £28.5m was cut from support for active travel projects and the Future Transport Fund, with just over £7m cut from road projects.

However, the savings will also fund doubling the value of Scotland’s December Bridging Payment for Children to £260m, increase council funding for additional discretionary housing payment support and provide a £1 emergency fund. £.4 million for the Island Cost Crisis to support those on islands facing even greater cost of living challenges.

The full Scottish budget, which will set out the budget scenario for next year, will be presented on December 15, including any planned tax hikes. Mr Swinney gave an idea of ​​the scale of the challenge, saying the reserves earmarked for next year’s budget had yet to be found in this year’s budget. This suggests that the finalized budget will be well below the already difficult projections of May’s Resource Spending Review, which predicted cuts in real terms across the majority of portfolios, including local government and justice. Such a situation could see even bigger cuts announced alongside tax hikes for Scots just before Christmas.

Mairi Spowage, director of the Fraser of Allander Institute, said the rigidity of the Scottish government’s budget meant a “strong argument” could be made for strengthening taxing powers. She said: “The lack of real capacity on the part of the Scottish Government to be able to adjust its budget within the year in response to unforeseen shocks remains a real limitation of the existing budget rulebook. As we noted in a report last year, in collaboration with IFS [Institute for Fiscal Studies] and the University of Stirling, strong arguments can be made to strengthen the ability of the Scottish Government to borrow and/or draw resources from its reserve.

“Such tax flexibilities would provide the Scottish Government with additional policy levers to deal with unprecedented circumstances.”

Philip Whyte, director of the Institute for Public Policy Research Scotland, said the UK government’s actions “cannot absolve the Scottish government of responsibility” despite the powers held in Downing Street. He said: “While this process has to some extent revealed the limitations of the current decentralization regulations, we cannot allow this to become an annual excuse for in-year cuts.

“Tackling child poverty, strong public services, a better and more inclusive economy and a sustainable future remain the priorities of the people of Scotland – they must be delivered. In the long term, the Scottish Government must think bigger – by looking at income tax, and wealth taxes and a replacement for regressive council tax – and using its existing powers more progressively to secure sustainable incomes to fund Scotland’s collective priorities .

The Scottish Government’s expert group, convened to advise on the emergency budget review, also called on the government to prioritize growth and productivity. In a document, they said it was “imperative for the Scottish Government to make tax choices that improve business investment and innovation” during the budget.

Want to know more about The Scotsman’s political team? Check out the latest episode of our political podcast, The Steamie.

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What to Know About NYC’s New Pay Transparency Law https://agapesgr.org/what-to-know-about-nycs-new-pay-transparency-law/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/what-to-know-about-nycs-new-pay-transparency-law/ Starting Tuesday, most New York employers will have to follow new rules about disclosing salary ranges in job postings, in an effort that fair pay advocates say will narrow pay gaps for workers. women and people of color. The law makes New York the largest municipality in the United States to mandate pay transparency for […]]]>

Starting Tuesday, most New York employers will have to follow new rules about disclosing salary ranges in job postings, in an effort that fair pay advocates say will narrow pay gaps for workers. women and people of color.

The law makes New York the largest municipality in the United States to mandate pay transparency for external and internal job postings. A similar law passed by the state legislature this year could go into effect if signed by Governor Kathy Hochul.

While elected officials and workers have applauded the law as a step toward fairness in the workplace, the city agency tasked with responding to allegations of violations of its rules is woefully understaffed, the councilwoman said. Gale Brewer, raising doubts about the full application of the law.

“It’s good law,” said Brewer, who chairs the council’s investigations committee. But, she added, the lack of staff “is a big problem”.

Here’s what you need to know about the new pay transparency law.

What is the law intended to correct?

Across industries and in municipal government, women are paid less than men in similar roles, and people of color are paid less than white workers, according to government reports.

The wage gap in New York state between men and women has widened in recent years, according to a March state comptroller report. In 2019, the latest year studied by the report, the median salary for male managers in New York City was $100,000, compared to $80,280 for women.

In the city’s municipal workforce, the median salary for men is $83,201 and $60,327 for women, according to a September city council report. Compared to every dollar earned by white employees in the city, Asian workers earn 85 cents; Hispanic workers earn 75 cents; and black workers receive 71 cents.

“This is a situation in which people are chronically underpaid,” said Esta Bigler, director of the labor and employment law program at the School of Labor and Industrial Relations Cornell University at NY1. “And once you’re underpaid, it’s almost impossible to make up the deficit you have over your lifetime.”

Other reports suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic may have widened wage gaps, as black unemployment remains significantly higher than average and a significant drop in female labor force participation.

How does the law work?

The law requires all businesses or employers of covered domestic workers to list “good faith” pay scales for any posting of a new job, promotion, or transfer opportunity for New York-based positions. The law covers remote jobs and part-time jobs.

“‘Good faith’ means the salary range that the employer honestly believes at the time of posting the job offer that he is willing to pay the successful candidate(s)”, according to the city’s fact sheet on the law.

Any business with four or more employees (including the owner) and at least one employee working in New York is covered by the law. The law also covers any employer of at least one domestic worker.

In job postings, employers must post lower and upper salary estimates wherever they advertise the position. The posting does not have to include other benefits, such as health care or overtime.

How do I report violations and what are the penalties?

To submit anonymous reports of potential violations of the law, call the city’s Human Rights Commission at (212) 416-0197, or fill out this form.

Companies found to have broken the law will initially have 30 days to remedy the violation. If an employer does not resolve a violation, they may have to pay up to $250,000.

Potential workers and employees can also sue companies in civil court for alleged violation of the law.

How effective will the municipal application be?

City agencies are experiencing historic labor shortages, struggling to retain workers who want more flexibility to work from home or attract new workers with existing wage structures.

The Human Rights Commission, which is tasked with investigating violations of city labor rules like the Pay Transparency Act, as well as housing discrimination, has perhaps the most high proportion of vacancies from all city offices, Brewer said.

In June, she said, its headcount was 99 out of 136 budgeted positions, a vacancy rate of about 27%. The understaffing, she said, could not only affect the agency’s ability to respond to complaints, but also conduct proactive investigations to seek out instances of pay transparency law violations.

“A really good commission would look at some of these companies and do some research,” she said. “I’ve been worried about it since day one.”

Brewer said the council, which has held several hearings on the city’s issues with retaining and recruiting new workers, hopes to increase funding in next year’s budget for key agencies.

The Human Rights Commission did not respond to a request for comment.

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IPO: four cos should be made public next week; seeks to raise more than Rs 4,500 cr https://agapesgr.org/ipo-four-cos-should-be-made-public-next-week-seeks-to-raise-more-than-rs-4500-cr/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 07:38:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/ipo-four-cos-should-be-made-public-next-week-seeks-to-raise-more-than-rs-4500-cr/ The primary market is heading for a busy period, with four companies, including Global Health Ltd, which operates hospitals under the Medanta brand, and microfinance lender Fusion Micro Finance Ltd, lining up their IPOs next week. The other two companies with IPOs set to open are DCX Systems, a manufacturer of cables and wire harnesses, […]]]>
The primary market is heading for a busy period, with four companies, including Global Health Ltd, which operates hospitals under the Medanta brand, and microfinance lender Fusion Micro Finance Ltd, lining up their IPOs next week. The other two companies with IPOs set to open are DCX Systems, a manufacturer of cables and wire harnesses, and Bikaji Foods International.

Together, these four companies are expected to fetch more than Rs 4,500 crore from IPOs, sources in the investment bank say.

Apart from these, Uniparts India and Five Star Business Finance are expected to publish their respective IPOs in November, they added.

The initial sale of DCX Systems shares will open for public subscription on October 31 and will close on November 2, while that of Fusion Micro Finance will be open from November 2 to 4.

The IPOs of Global Health and Bikaji Foods will open for subscription on November 3 and close on November 7.

In 2022 so far, up to 22 companies have launched their IPOs to raise over Rs 44,000 crore. In 2021, 63 IPOs raised more than Rs 1.19 lakh crore, according to exchange data.

“Secondary market volatility has led to a weak IPO market in 2022 and it is expected to remain subdued going forward,” said Vinod Nair, head of research at .

However, investor response to the proposed IPOs has been decent due to the opportunity to invest in new ventures at attractive prices. This was also against the backdrop of high liquidity available from HNIs and retail investors looking for a quote gain, he said.

In the majority of cases, IPOs were also attractive to institutional investors wishing to invest in new, high-quality companies bringing diversification to programs, he added.

DCX Systems IPO includes new issue of capital shares worth Rs 400 crore and offer for sale (OFS) of capital shares up to Rs 100 crore by promoters NCBG Holdings Inc and VNG Technology.

The Bengaluru-based company has already raised Rs 225 crore from anchor investors. It has set a price range of Rs 197-207 per share for its issuance.

The proceeds from the new issue will be used for the payment of debt, the financing of working capital requirements, the investment in its wholly owned subsidiary Raneal Advanced Systems to finance its capital expenditures and general corporate purposes. .

Merger Micro Finance is seeking to raise Rs 1,104 crore from its IPO, which includes a new issue of capital shares worth Rs 600 crore and an offer for sale of 13,695,466 capital shares by promoters and existing shareholders.

Those selling shares in the SFO are — Devesh Sachdev, Mini Sachdev, Honey Rose Investment Ltd, Creation Investments Fusion, LLC, Oikocredit Ecumenical Development Co-operative Society UA and Global Financial Inclusion Fund.

The net proceeds from the new issue will be used to increase the capital base of the microfinance business. The company has set a price range of Rs 350-368 per share.

The Global Health IPO consists of a new issue of capital shares totaling Rs 500 crore and an OFS of up to 5.08 crore capital shares by Anant Investments, a subsidiary of private equity giant Carlyle Group, and Sunil Sachdeva (jointly with Suman Sachdeva).

The IPO price range has been set at Rs 319-336 per share and at the upper end of the price range, the company is expected to earn Rs 2,206 crore from the issuance.

Proceeds from the new issue will be used to pay debt and general corporate purposes.

Bikaji is aiming to mop up around Rs 1,000 crore from his initial sale of shares, investment banking sources have said.

Some shareholders of the Rajasthan-based company along with its promoters – Shiv Ratan Agarwal and Deepak Agarwal – will unload around 2.94 crores of shares through the SFO route.

The shares of the four companies will be listed on the BSE and the NSE.

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Russia continues to fund US media https://agapesgr.org/russia-continues-to-fund-us-media/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 22:28:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/russia-continues-to-fund-us-media/ With Daniel Lipman RUSSIAN STATE MEDIA MONEY KEEPS FLOWING: Months after Russia invaded Ukraine and media companies abandoned the country’s state programming, Russian government funding continues to flow to American media. Between April and the end of September, the Russian state media group Rossiya Segodnya channeled $3,284,169 to Ghebi, a company that produces articles, newswires […]]]>

With Daniel Lipman

RUSSIAN STATE MEDIA MONEY KEEPS FLOWING: Months after Russia invaded Ukraine and media companies abandoned the country’s state programming, Russian government funding continues to flow to American media.

Between April and the end of September, the Russian state media group Rossiya Segodnya channeled $3,284,169 to Ghebi, a company that produces articles, newswires and a number of radio shows. During that same period, Ghebi spent $2,183,640.72 on behalf of his client, according to an October filing with the Justice Department under the Foreign Agents Registration Act.

POLITICO Influence reported in August that Ghebi and the agency, which controls the outlet Sputnik, had renewed their contract, with a one-year budget set at $7 million, the largest since Ghebi began reporting his contracts to the Justice Department. Although companies, including Youtube and Direc TV abandoned Russian state media, the country’s government seems to continue to see value in media spending, even as it wages war on Ukraine.

That same month, Rebel Media Productions – a company run by a controversial former local news anchor Benjamin Swan – registered to represent Russian government-backed media organization TV Novosti. The production company would oversee video production for TV Novosti and other clients, focusing solely on the Indian, Chinese and South American television markets. A filing also noted that Rebel Media Productions received $609,792 to pay for the layoff. RT America employees.

Happy Thursday and welcome to PI! My name is Hailey Fuchs, and I cover POLITICO’s money and influence. I’ll be taking over the newsletter for the rest of the week. Send me all your advice on [email protected]. Follow me on Twitter: @Hailey_Fuchs.

FEDERAL LOBBYING SPENDING EXCEEDS $3 BILLION: “Federal lobbyists raised $3 billion in the third quarter of 2022, a record in what will likely be the most expensive year for federal lobbying yet,” reports Open SecretsTaylor Giorno.

– “The trend follows unprecedented lobbying spending of $1.1 billion in the first quarter of 2022, which ballooned to $2 billion spent in the second quarter.”

— “Organizations are only about $743.6 million away from the record $3.8 billion spent on federal lobbying in 2021. There has not been a quarter since 2008 where federal lobbyists have received less than $743.6 million, anything but ensuring that 2022 will be a record year for the federal government. lobbyists when the fourth quarter disclosures are filed on January 20.

— “More than 13,400 organizations deployed more than 11,900 federal lobbyists in the first nine months of 2022. The 10 clients who spent the most money on federal lobbying during this period represented 8% of all federal lobbying expenditures.

MERCURY DEVELOPS ITS PRACTICAL STATES: The lobbying and consulting firm Mercury announced on Thursday that he had expanded his “multi-state base practice.” The practice will be led by Robert Jonesformer senior vice president of U.S. government relations and public affairs at Pfizerand John Moffettformerly of TALK Strategica South Carolina public affairs and communications firm.

— “States are often overlooked in Washington, but they are an essential complement to any national effort,” said the CEO of Mercury. Kieran Mahoney said in a press release, announcing the company’s growth. “We have invested significant resources in building our state offices to meet the needs of clients, often amplifying their message in Washington. No plan is complete without a significant state-level operation to identify threats and opportunities.

– POLITICO noted in June that K Street was looking to states for new revenue, amid a standoff in Washington. Read this story here.

RESUME OF THE MENENDEZ INVESTIGATION: Sen. Bob Mendez (DN.J.) Under Investigation, POLITICO Reports Matt Friedman.

“’Senator Menendez is aware of an investigation that was reported today. However, he doesn’t know the scope of the investigation,’ adviser to Menendez Michael Suleiman said in response to an inquiry. “As always, if formal requests are made, the senator is available to provide any assistance requested of him or his office.”

— “Quoting two sources, the digital news agency Semafor reported that the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York is investigating Menendez – five years after he beat federal corruption charges.

FARA’S CONFUSION HITS AT LAWYERS“The first planned U.S. overhaul of foreign lobbying disclosure rules in 30 years is rooted in more aggressive Justice Department enforcement that has left a growing number of lawyers practicing in the space uncertain of its reach. “, reports Bloomberg Lawit is Ben Penn.

— “Practitioner interest and confusion surrounding the Foreign Agents Registration Act comes amid investigations and lawsuits seeking to compel lobbying transparency from prominent figures. Cases have involved allies of the two previous presidents, including an investigation into whether Rudy Giuliani was acting as an unregistered agent for Ukrainian nationals and an indictment of Obama’s White House lawyer Greg Craig. Giuliani was not charged and Craig was found not guilty.

— “Sentences up to five years in prison for willful violators, FARA mandates public disclosure when individuals, businesses, or nonprofits act on behalf of foreign interests. It contains exceptions that apply to lawyers, which have proven difficult to interpret for work at the intersection of legal representation and political advocacy.

Mary Comella launched the strategic communications and advocacy company Comella & Cie. She was most recently Head of Public Affairs and Brand at CLEAR, and held senior management positions for both former governors. Chris Christie (RN.J.) and Andrew Cuomo (DN.Y.), and on several presidential campaigns.

Michael Chang, former deputy assistant secretary for Commerce Department policy, heads to nonprofit Strada Educational Network become its Chief Strategy Officer.

Jennifer Pensiveformer political adviser to SEC Chairman Gary Gensler is heading to the private sector to join the law firm Paul, Weiss as a member of the firm’s private fund group.

Antonio De Loera-Brust is now Director of Communications at United Farmworkers. He was previously a special assistant at the State Department.

Robert Smith joined Platinum Advisors the government relations team. He was previously Managing Director at Mercury Public Affairs and is a Joel Hefley, Wes Watkins and RNC alumnus.

Andre Cohen joined the US German Marshall Fund as its very first editor. He was previously Director of Communications at Pew Research Center.

Brad Smithpresident and vice president of Microsoft, and Julie SweetChairman and CEO of Accenture, will chair a new AI Council at Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Kevin L. Miller and Jason B.Caron rejoin Latham and Watkins to further expand the company’s healthcare offerings, the company said.

Increase salary with Fetterman Fund (Fetterman for PA, Fems for Dems PAC)

DemsMight (Super PAC)

We’re sick of it (Super PAC)

Every job is essential PAC (Super PAC)

Liebman & Associates, Inc.: WEC Energy Group Inc.

LSN Partners, LLC: Disaster Technologies Incorporated

Dentons Global Advisors Government Relations LLC: Semiconductor Component Industries LLC

Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, LLP: Woodside Energy

Mcguirewoods Consulting (a subsidiary of Mcguirewoods LLP): Finger Paint One, LLC

The Halcrow Group LLC: Advanced Technology International (on behalf of the National Armaments Consortium)

High Street Strategies LLC: Island Institute

Thorn Run Partners: Naval and Maritime Consortium

Thorn Run Partners: Process Technology

Thorn Run Partners: Classone Technology Inc.

Thorn Run Partners: Nanoshift LLC

Liebman & Associates, Inc.: Stonewater Minerals, LLC

Liebman & Associates, Inc.: Arcimoto, LLC

Vendorpass, Inc.: Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC

Fifestrategies, LLC: Draken International, LLC

Jenner & Block LLP: Mapetsi Policy Group LLC on behalf of the San Carlos Apache Tribe

Jenner & Block LLP: Mapetsi Policy Group LLC on behalf of the Samish Indian Nation

LLC Watershed Results: Mystic Aquarium

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Missouri voters will decide if state can dictate Kansas City police funding boost • Missouri Independent https://agapesgr.org/missouri-voters-will-decide-if-state-can-dictate-kansas-city-police-funding-boost-missouri-independent/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 18:20:59 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/missouri-voters-will-decide-if-state-can-dictate-kansas-city-police-funding-boost-missouri-independent/ If Missouri voters approve Amendment 4 in the Nov. 8 general election, Kansas City will need to increase funding for its police department. But many voters may not understand this from the language they will see on the ballot. Amendment 4 reads: “Should the Missouri Constitution be amended to authorize laws, passed before December 31, […]]]>

If Missouri voters approve Amendment 4 in the Nov. 8 general election, Kansas City will need to increase funding for its police department.

But many voters may not understand this from the language they will see on the ballot.

Amendment 4 reads: “Should the Missouri Constitution be amended to authorize laws, passed before December 31, 2026, that increase the minimum funding for a police force established by a state board of police commissioners to ensure that this police force has additional resources to serve its communities?”

There’s only one police department in Missouri, and possibly the country, that’s controlled by the state, not local city government officials — and that’s the police department. Kansas City Police.

A new law passed this year aims to increase the minimum share of Kansas City’s budget that must be spent on the police department from 20% to 25%, an increase of $65.2 million.

However, the Missouri constitution states that the legislature cannot require a city to increase any activity or service beyond what is required by applicable law, unless a state appropriation is available. be made to pay the city for any increased costs.

Led by Sen. Tony Luetkemeyer, R-Parkville, lawmakers also adopted a proposed constitutional amendment this spring, which would provide an exception for Kansas City police, if approved by voters in the state.

Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas said the city council already regularly funds the police department above the 25% threshold, so the new mandate will not immediately increase the police budget.

“Instead, the bill represents the crude exercise of power by state legislators over the people of Kansas City, as the only people in our state without the ability to influence how a quarter of our budget is spent,” Lucas said in a statement after the governor signed the bill.

Lucas was referring to the fact that Kansas City is the only city in the state where local elected officials, by law, have virtually no authority over how the police department’s budget is spent. A Board of Commissioners appointed by the Governor makes these decisions.

Lütkemeyer pushed for increased funding after Lucas and some city council members tried to designate $42 million in the police budget for things like community engagement and response. A judge eventually ruled they didn’t have that authority.

“When a majority of City Council voted to cut $42 million from KCPD’s budget in 2021, I knew I had to do something to prevent future police funding efforts,” Luetkemeyer said in a statement. statement after signing the invoice.

Lucas argues that it’s not the council members who have repeatedly “defunded” police salaries – this is the Board of Commissioners.

In August, Lucas filed a complaint against the state, arguing that the law requiring the city to spend more on police is unconstitutional.

“The sweeping legislation provides no wage guarantees for our officers,” Lucas said, “won’t hire a single police officer and ignores the will and importance of Kansas City taxpayers, instead trying to politicize maintaining the order in Kansas City at a time when we badly need bipartisan solutions to violent crime.

A spokesman for Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt, a named defendant in the lawsuit whose office will represent the state, said Lucas put “politics ahead of public safety.”

“The Attorney General’s Office will continue to support the brave men and women of law enforcement, and we will vigorously defend Missouri state laws in this case,” Schmitt spokesman Chris Nuelle said. “The people of Missouri deserve to feel safe in their communities, and we will continue to fight to make sure they do.”

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