Money principal – Agapes GR http://agapesgr.org/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 02:30:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://agapesgr.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T194407.031-150x150.png Money principal – Agapes GR http://agapesgr.org/ 32 32 Top 5 Money Lessons to Learn in Your 40s https://agapesgr.org/top-5-money-lessons-to-learn-in-your-40s/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 21:00:13 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/top-5-money-lessons-to-learn-in-your-40s/ Pekic/Getty Images There are certain financial lessons that everyone should master before the age of 40. Some of them may seem a bit obvious while others are tailored to this specific stage of life. Let’s look at the top five money lessons you need to learn before you turn 40. Explore: GOBankingRates’ Best Credit Cards […]]]>

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There are certain financial lessons that everyone should master before the age of 40. Some of them may seem a bit obvious while others are tailored to this specific stage of life. Let’s look at the top five money lessons you need to learn before you turn 40.

Explore: GOBankingRates’ Best Credit Cards for 2023
See our list: 100 Most Influential Money Experts

Put retirement savings first

Those in their mid to late 40s are about 20 years away from retirement. Now is the time to accelerate your retirement savings, said Heather Winston, CFP and director of financial planning and advice at Principal.

“You’re at a point in your life where you’re probably in your highest earning years, which gives you the opportunity to start saving exponentially and maxing out your 401(k),” Winston said.

It’s time to stop saying “I plan to save for retirement” and start saving for retirement if you haven’t already, said Mark Henry, founder and CEO of Alloy Wealth Management. Make regular contributions to a 401(k) or other employer-sponsored retirement plan and fund after-tax accounts like a brokerage or a Roth IRA.

“You should be done trying to become a millionaire overnight,” Henry said. “By this point in life, you should have learned that you are an investor, not a Wall Street trader. You are a long-term investor, going through the ups and downs in search of long-term appreciation and meeting regularly with a trusted financial advisor.

If you haven’t quite caught up yet, Winston said not to dwell on where you could have saved before. Instead, ask yourself today if there are any places where you can potentially cut back or make adjustments to ensure you are well prepared for the future.

Take part in our survey: do you think you can retire at 65?

Be strategic to pay off your debts

At 40, you should be able to have certain types of debt, such as credit cards, paid off in full. Those with other debts, such as home or auto loans, should make a game plan to pay them off.

Henry recommends starting with the smallest debts and paying them off before tackling the biggest debts. This helps the debt feel much more manageable than trying to pay off several large debts at once.

As you work to pay off and avoid getting into debt, consider using this time to track your spending habits, said Sam Palmer, head of digital wealth planning and advice at JP Morgan Wealth Management. You can use online tools to determine your top spending categories and your actual cash flow each month, quarter, or year.

Have an emergency fund

This is good financial advice at any stage of your life, but those in their 40s or in that age bracket need to build an emergency fund. Henry said that before you pay off debt or tackle other financial goals, you’ll want to make sure you have funds set aside as a safety net.

“The goal should be to save enough to cover monthly expenses for three to six months,” Henry said. “If you don’t have an emergency fund because you’ve spent all your extra money trying to pay off your debts, you’ll go into even more debt the next time unexpected expenses arise.”

Work alongside a professional

Those who still struggle with money and the practical concepts of personal finance shouldn’t feel like they have to go it alone at this age.

Winston recommends working with a finance professional. “They can be very helpful in these circumstances to ensure that you understand your own personal retirement plans and where you can of course correct today to be in good shape for the future.”

Disseminate the wealth of knowledge

Many people are married by the time they are in their 40s. Some may already have children, plan to start a family, or have nephews and nieces.

Palmer recommends using this time to have open conversations about money with the people you care about and to help teach financial health to the younger generation. “It’s never too early to start the financial journey and inculcate good habits from the start.”

More from GOBankingRates

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: Experts: Top 5 Money Lessons To Learn by 40

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Dubai Financial Services Authority Releases New Regime to Regulate Crypto Tokens | Latham & Watkins LLP https://agapesgr.org/dubai-financial-services-authority-releases-new-regime-to-regulate-crypto-tokens-latham-watkins-llp/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 17:57:47 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/dubai-financial-services-authority-releases-new-regime-to-regulate-crypto-tokens-latham-watkins-llp/ The regime is introducing rules on various crypto tokens, including cryptocurrencies and stablecoins, in the international financial center of Dubai. On November 1, 2022, the Dubai Financial Services Authority (DFSA) crypto token regulatory regime came into effect. The rules extend the DFSA framework for regulating investment tokens established in 2021 (the 2021 rules). The Dubai […]]]>

The regime is introducing rules on various crypto tokens, including cryptocurrencies and stablecoins, in the international financial center of Dubai.

On November 1, 2022, the Dubai Financial Services Authority (DFSA) crypto token regulatory regime came into effect.

The rules extend the DFSA framework for regulating investment tokens established in 2021 (the 2021 rules). The Dubai International Financial Center (DIFC) scheme defines a token as a cryptographically secure digital representation of value, rights or obligations that can be issued, transferred and stored electronically, using ledger technology distributed (DLT) or other similar technology. The 2021 rules regulated only investment tokens, which included security tokens and derivative tokens (in essence, token equivalents of conventional securities and derivatives, respectively) (investment tokens). Under the 2021 rules, persons engaging in certain activities with investment tokens (e.g. issuing, offering, holding, promoting, trading, advising, trading) must obtain DFSA approval and comply with certain obligations.

On March 8, 2022, the DFSA released its Consultation Paper 143 (the Consultation Paper), setting out regulatory proposals for other types of tokens, in particular cryptocurrencies, payment tokens, and hybrid utility tokens ( for example, which provide additional rights to tokens). holders, such as discounts).

The consultation document invited the market to provide comments on the planned regime by May 6, 2022 and, on October 18, 2022, issued a feedback statement regarding the comments received (the statement). The Statement did not anticipate major changes to the proposals outlined in the consultation document.

Key Definitions in the DFSA Regime

A Encryption token is a token if it: (a) is used, or is intended to be used, as a medium of exchange or for payment for investment purposes; or (b) confers a right or interest in another token that meets the requirements of clause (a) above.

The scheme defines a Fiat Crypto Token (e.g., stablecoin) as a type of cryptographic token in which price and volatility are determined, in whole or in part, by reference to a fiat currency or a combination of fiat currencies.

A token is not a Crypto Token (and falls outside the scope of the new regime) if it is (i) an Investment Token (or any other type of investment) or (ii) an Exclud Token. The first type of token is governed by the 2021 rules.

Tokens excluded

  • Non-fungible tokens (NFT) are unique and non-fungible tokens. They relate to identified assets and prove ownership or provenance of those assets. In the view of the DFSA, no financial services are provided via NFTs and therefore these tokens should be outside the scope of the new rules.
  • Utility Tokens are tokens that can only be used by the holder to pay, benefit from a discount or access a product or service provided by the issuer or an entity of its group. The DFSA suggested continuing to monitor developments around these tokens to determine if they should be regulated.
  • CBDC refers to digital currency issued by any government, government agency, central bank or other monetary authority. The DFSA viewed these tokens as similar to fiat currencies.

Excluded tokens generally fall outside the scope of the new regime. However, the DFSA noted that certain issuers and service providers of NFTs or Utility Tokens must be registered as Designated Non-Financial Businesses and Professions (DNFBPs) in order to comply with anti-money laundering rules, and submit suspicious transaction reports in the UAE. authorities.

Prohibited tokens

  • Algorithmic tokens are Crypto Tokens using an algorithm of increasing or decreasing the supply of Crypto Tokens to stabilize the price or reduce its volatility.
  • Privacy Tokens are Crypto Tokens intended to allow the holder to hide, anonymize, obscure or prevent the tracking of:

Prohibited tokens cannot be used in the DIFC. The DFSA banned them due to a lack of transparency regarding the algorithms used and the transactions made with the use of these tokens.

Regulated activities within the scheme

Persons need permission from the DFSA to engage in dealing (as principal or agent), arrangement, management, advice, negotiation, clearing, provision of custodial services and conducting certain other activities with respect to Crypto Tokens (Authorized Persons). Certain activities are expressly prohibited:

  • An Approved Person is not permitted to engage in any activity related to a utility token or an NFT (to separate activities regarding regulated and unregulated tokens).
  • The use of Crypto Tokens by money service providers is generally not permitted, except where such tokens are Fiat Crypto Tokens used solely for the purpose of transferring money or performing a payment transaction, and provided that these tokens are in the name of the money service provider (not its client).
  • Crowdfunding operators are not permitted to operate platforms that facilitate investments in Crypto Tokens. It is also prohibited to organize commercial facilities related to Crypto Tokens.

Approved Persons must comply with a number of requirements, depending on the exact scope of their activities. These requirements may include obligations for reporting, disclosure, ensuring information security, or stating certain mandatory terms in customer agreements.

Recognition of cryptographic tokens

Regulated activities cannot take place in the DIFC with Crypto Tokens, unless the DFSA recognizes the tokens (Recognized Crypto Tokens).

Recognition of tokens by the DFSA is based on a number of criteria (which the DFSA assesses cumulatively), including regulatory status in other jurisdictions, adequacy of transparency and technology used, risk mitigation and size, as well as market liquidity and volatility.

The DFSA has determined the initial list of recognized crypto tokens, namely recognized Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH), and Litecoin (LTC). An authorized person, an applicant for the relevant DFSA approval, or an issuer or developer of the crypto token may file an application with the DFSA for recognition of specific crypto tokens.

The DFSA may revoke Recognized Crypto Token status if the affected crypto token becomes unsuitable for use in the DIFC. Approved Persons must notify the DFSA of material events or developments that reasonably suggest the crypto token no longer meets the criteria.

Summary

The new regime represents a step forward on the part of the DFSA in regulating tokens in the DIFC-free zone. It aims to establish the DIFC as a hub for Virtual Asset Service Providers (VASPs), similar to the Abu Dhabi Global Market (ADGM) (which, since its introduction in 2018, has run its own regulatory framework for virtual assets) and the recent one established the Dubai Virtual Asset Regulatory Authority (DVARA), which regulates the activities of VASPs in the Emirate of Dubai outside the geographical area of ​​the DIFC.

The regulatory approach taken is generally consistent with that of the ADGM and the approach taken at the federal levels of the United Arab Emirates and the Emirates. (Read this Latham blog post for more information.)

Questions remain as to what further steps the DFSA will take to regulate the crypto industry and how the DIFC regime will interact with rules promulgated outside the DIFC at the individual Emirati and federal level. The DFSA announcements set expectations for further consultations on crypto tokens, which will focus, among other things, on decentralized finance (DeFi).

Latham & Watkins will continue to monitor developments related to virtual assets in the Middle East, including additional upcoming rules and regulations.

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Principal, cops in Millaniya child torture case, released on bail https://agapesgr.org/principal-cops-in-millaniya-child-torture-case-released-on-bail/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:57:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/principal-cops-in-millaniya-child-torture-case-released-on-bail/ COLOMBO (News 1st) – The Principal of Millaniya Elementary School, Millaniya Police Inspector and a Police Sergeant who were arrested and remanded in custody for torturing children, have been released on bail by the additional magistrate of Colombo, Keminda Perera. The suspects were released on two personal bonds of Rs. 1 million each. They were […]]]>

COLOMBO (News 1st) – The Principal of Millaniya Elementary School, Millaniya Police Inspector and a Police Sergeant who were arrested and remanded in custody for torturing children, have been released on bail by the additional magistrate of Colombo, Keminda Perera.

The suspects were released on two personal bonds of Rs. 1 million each.

They were arrested by the National Child Protection Authority for allegedly torturing several grade 5 students at Millaniya Primary School for allegedly stealing a teacher’s wallet.

The president’s attorney who appeared for the suspects made statements in court, and subsequently the additional magistrate granted bail.

The National Child Protection Authority lawyer appearing in court said investigations into the incident were nearly complete.

The lawyer also said that the parents and guardians of the students who were allegedly tortured did not give their consent for the students to be brought before a forensic doctor.

The case will be called again on January 18, 2023.

Several fifth-graders at Millaniya Primary School in Horana were accused of stealing money from a teacher’s bag and were punished by teachers at the school, and the teachers themselves turned the students over to the local police.

The parents allege that the students were taken away by the police to be intimidated by electric shocks inside the police jeep and then driven back to school.

Two abused boys told News 1st that officers took them in a jeep and threatened them with electric shocks to reveal the truth, then drove them back to school.

Two police officers and a school director have been remanded in custody for torturing fifth-grade students at Millaniya Primary School in Horana.

The headmaster of Millaniya Gangamuwa Primary School, the deputy headmaster, a police inspector, a police sergeant and a police officer were summoned to the National Child Protection Authority on November 8 to record a statement on the incident of child torture.

They were roasted for more than five hours and then presented to the Colombo Magistrate’s Court.

Three suspects have been remanded in custody by the Colombo Supplementary Magistrate, while the deputy director and police officer have been released on bail.

Recent news

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Philadelphia Eagles Name 2022 Fan of the Year https://agapesgr.org/philadelphia-eagles-name-2022-fan-of-the-year/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 18:28:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/philadelphia-eagles-name-2022-fan-of-the-year/ Philadelphia Eagles (Photo by Corey Perrine/Getty Images) Fantasy Football Projections for Eagles vs Commanders in Week 10 by Bruce Ewing The legend, Brandon Graham, has just been called to the principal’s office. Relax, it’s not what you think. The longtime defensive end was there to announce the Philadelphia Eagles Fan of the Year for 2022. […]]]>

Philadelphia Eagles Fan of the Year and that he would represent the Eagles in this year’s NFL Fan of the Year contest.

Here’s what you need to know about the Philadelphia Eagles Fan of the Year for 2022.

Mount Pleasant Elementary is a small school in Wilmington, Delaware. It has approximately 700 students and a staff of 54 teachers. It is just 22 miles southwest of Lincoln Financial Field. Auerbach has been an educator for 20 years, nine of them as principal.

In his office, Principal Auerbach keeps an Eagles poster next to his American flag. He even has students do an Eagles cheer as part of the morning announcements before games.

Auerbach is married with two children. He loves going to games with his son Noah as much as he loved going to games with his dad as a kid. Both father and son have traveled to see their favorite team take on the Commanders and Giants on the road and are season ticket holders thanks to Auerbach’s late father.

As part of the award, Auerbach receives tickets to Super Bowl LVII and is eligible to win the NFL Fan of the Year award. Fans can vote for him on NFL.com where he appears with 31 contestants from other teams.

With things going so well for the Philadelphia Eagles this season, it would be great to see Principal Auerbach named NFL Fan of the Year. Eagles fans have always been the best in the league, so consider giving him your vote.

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Here’s what newly approved Austin ISD bonds could do to your tax bill https://agapesgr.org/heres-what-newly-approved-austin-isd-bonds-could-do-to-your-tax-bill/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 04:19:25 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/heres-what-newly-approved-austin-isd-bonds-could-do-to-your-tax-bill/ Austin ISD officials say there could be an increase of about $0.01 for every $100 of assessment, bringing the district’s debt service from 11.3 cents to 12, 3 cents. AUSTIN, Texas — About $2.4 billion is what voters approved for schools in the Austin ISD system. The bond package should be used to upgrade buildings […]]]>

Austin ISD officials say there could be an increase of about $0.01 for every $100 of assessment, bringing the district’s debt service from 11.3 cents to 12, 3 cents.

AUSTIN, Texas — About $2.4 billion is what voters approved for schools in the Austin ISD system.

The bond package should be used to upgrade buildings and may even end up increasing teachers’ salaries. But what could that do to your taxes?

Austin ISD officials say there could be an increase of about $0.01 per $100 in your home’s value, bringing the current district’s debt service to 11.3 cents at 12.3 cents.

Say you have a home worth $500,000, you can expect to see about a $50 increase in property taxes from interest rates and lower district tax rates.

While the increase isn’t significant, economists like Matt Patton with “AngelouEconomics” say it’s still something people are going to have to adjust to.

“It’s not a huge jump, and I don’t want to downplay that. Any increase has to be budgeted for. But the overall result shows that Austin values ​​education and that commitment benefits the current workforce and to tomorrow’s workforce,” says Patton.

AISD officials also say there could be a 6.5 cent decrease in the overall tax rate, which includes both I&S and M&O taxes.

Patton said that may help offset other increases.

“We continue to grow here as a city. A slightly reduced tax rate will always generate more revenue because more people come to the area to pay those taxes,” Patton said.

But what will these obligations meet?

“This $2.44 billion will enable the district to provide the safety facilities and modern technology that all of our students and teachers deserve,” said AISD Acting Superintendent Dr. Anthony Mays.

Most of the money from the three bonds will go towards upgrading and upgrading buildings like LBJ and Travis Early College High School.

“Our students and teachers will have a campus they are proud of, a brand new school designed to inspire learning and prepare our students for the future,” said Erick Posadas, principal of Travis Early College Hight School.

AISD leaders say they currently need to spend millions on repairs, so the bonds will help them free up money for salaries and student programs.

Officials note that it could take teachers about two years to see those salaries increased, but they plan to address teacher salaries in next year’s budget.

Patton said improvements to these schools will also have economic impacts for years to come.

“There are some very obvious ones like construction, supporting that sector of the economy and all the repercussions that we see through that,” Patton said. “Beyond that, we’re going to see a better overall economy in Austin because it’s a better-prepared workforce, a better-prepared group of graduates entering local community colleges, universities, and then ultimately the workforce. -work.”

Tax increases are expected during the 2023-24 school year. For more information on the objectives of the three bonds, click here.

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NYC task force proposes budget changes https://agapesgr.org/nyc-task-force-proposes-budget-changes/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 22:32:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/nyc-task-force-proposes-budget-changes/ A task force tasked with rethinking how New York City distributes school funding released recommendations on Friday that could help change the way hundreds of millions of dollars are distributed to more than 1,500 public schools. Many of the proposals would have implications for a wide range of schools if adopted, including increasing funding for […]]]>

A task force tasked with rethinking how New York City distributes school funding released recommendations on Friday that could help change the way hundreds of millions of dollars are distributed to more than 1,500 public schools.

Many of the proposals would have implications for a wide range of schools if adopted, including increasing funding for campuses that serve more homeless students and those living in poverty.

Other recommendations would impact a relatively small set of schools but are nonetheless likely to spark controversy, including a proposal to eliminate a special funding increase at 13 of the city’s most selective high schools.

None of the ideas are binding – it is now up to Schools Chancellor David Banks and Mayor Eric Adams to decide whether or not to change the city’s funding formula for the next school year. The release of the report may create political pressure to act, as a previous task force convened under the last administration collapsed before officially releasing recommendations.

But enacting the task force’s proposals would either require a large influx of new funding or major cuts to some campuses, both of which would face political hurdles.

The task force report focuses on the city’s “fair student funding” formula, which channels about two-thirds of the money that goes into school budgets. Schools typically receive a base amount per student — this year it’s about $4,197. Students with additional needs — including people with disabilities, English language learners, and students with low test scores — come with extra dollars on top of the baseline.

The city’s funding formula is among the most progressive in the country, but proponents have long called for tweaks. The latest task force was created after the city’s Panel for Educational Policy, which is largely appointed by the mayor, took the unusual step of voting against the funding formula for this school year. Although the formula was later approved, officials promised to launch a working group to solicit feedback.

The report’s proposals would cost between $375 million and $983 million, depending on the specific combination of recommendations included, according to Department of Education figures.

Without additional funding, directing more money to some campuses will necessitate cuts to others. Larger schools and those with fewer low-income students would face significant cuts under this, according to the city’s projections. This could be a political no-start, as the vast majority of schools are already facing cuts due to declining enrollment.

Alternatively, the city could allocate new funds to city schools to pay for the changes to ensure they don’t cut into school budgets. But senior officials have already signaled they plan to make across-the-board cuts to city agencies, including the education department.

In a letter to task force members, Banks wrote that the Education Department would evaluate the proposals “in the current fiscal environment” and use the recommendations to apply the formula “most fairly for next year.”

The city’s teachers’ union – which participated in the task force alongside parent leaders, policy experts and advocates – raised concerns about how the proposals would be funded in the days leading up to the release of the report, according to a copy of a letter to another task force members obtained by Chalkbeat.

“Given the losses our schools and students have suffered in recent years, the last thing the system should be doing is setting up a ‘Hunger Games’ scenario that will pit school against school,” Michael wrote. Mulgrew, union president. “The plan must include a disclaimer that will prevent schools from seeing their budgets cut if these recommendations are adopted.”

Jasmine Gripper, executive director of advocacy group Alliance for Quality Education and co-chair of the task force, said questions about how to pay for proposals were a source of tension within the group.

“What we’re trying to do is direct more resources to the schools that have the greatest need and we don’t want to rob Peter to pay Paul,” she said. At the same time, “there are people who think the system doesn’t need more money, it just needs to be better distributed.

Gripper added that the task force only had three months to come up with proposals, limiting the group’s ability to conduct a comprehensive review, although she said the current recommendations were a good start. The report also proposes that the group continue to meet.

For now, though, here’s what the task force’s current recommendations would do:

Channeling more money to homeless students and those living in poverty

Nearly 10% of the city’s students live in temporary accommodation, including a recent influx of migrants from South American countries. Although some federal funding is allocated to homeless students, the city’s formula does not provide additional money for these children. The task force wants the city to change that.

The Department of Education should increase the base amount of per-student funding from 12% to 24% per homeless student, the report recommends, which would cost between $43 million and $86 million. Without new funding for this change, the city projects that the new burden of homeless students would shift funding from approximately 700 low-poverty schools to those with higher poverty.

The report argues that additional funds are needed to combat chronic absenteeism, higher dropout rates and intense stressors related to housing instability. Principals can spend the money allocated through the funding formula as they see fit, but the report suggests that principals use it to hire additional social workers or partner with community organizations – groups that often provide social services, outreach, etc.

Children living in poverty – about 70% of the student population – should also receive additional funding, the report says. The city already allocates additional funds to low-income students, but it is limited to schools that serve students below fourth grade. Raising the poverty burden, even modestly, is expensive — between $138 million and $276 million, depending on how aggressively it is raised — because such a large percentage of students come from low-income families. .

Nix the special bonus for elite high schools

The city’s funding formula is designed to send additional resources to schools that enroll students in need. But a group of 13 elite high schools — serving relatively few black and Latino students, English learners, or students with disabilities — are getting a special bonus. This year it’s about $1,049 per student.

The report recommends eliminating extra funding to those 13 schools, which include eight specialist high schools that admit students on the basis of a single exam. Instead, the city should distribute that money, about $26 million, “to support advanced courses for more students,” according to the task force.

Funding for city schools should primarily bring more resources to students in need, and “a weight for specialist college high schools does not necessarily align with this overall vision of greater equity,” the recommendation says.

The report does not specify precisely how to redistribute the money. The proposal is likely to prove controversial, as the move would cut funding for some of the city’s best-known and most politically connected schools, including Stuyvesant (which would lose $4.3 million), Brooklyn Tech ($8 million ) and Bronx Science ($4 million). ).

New funding for schools in need

With few exceptions, the city’s funding formula allocates funds based on the number of students rather than to specific schools. But the task force recommends that the city add a new funding stream specifically for schools that serve unusually high concentrations of homeless students, people with disabilities, English language learners, homestay students and those from low-income households.

“Schools that serve students with a greater myriad of needs need more resources to support these populations than individual student level weightings provide,” according to the report.

The top third of schools with a higher concentration of high-need students would receive additional funding while the majority of schools forgo it. Depending on the proposal’s exact implementation model, even very poor schools could lose money because they are not serving high concentrations of other needy student groups. The Department of Education predicts the change would cost between $60 million and $120 million.

Increase base funding for all campuses – but concerns about small schools loom large

In addition to per-student funding, each school receives $225,000, traditionally to pay for a principal and secretary. The report recommends increasing this amount to cover additional positions, as some campuses may struggle to pay for a full range of mental health and academic staff — especially those with fewer students.

The task force recommends two possible funding increases. We would add $105,000, which is roughly the cost of a social worker. Another would increase the basic allowance by $345,000, which would include the cost of a social worker, guidance counselor and assistant principal.

These proposals are costly: between 160 and 526 million dollars. Without additional funding, the proposal would represent a significant transfer of resources from larger schools to smaller ones and would only modestly increase funding for poorer schools, according to the Department for Education’s analysis. The 10 largest schools in the city would lose an average of $712 per student.

Increasing funding for schools, regardless of the number of students enrolled, helps small schools, whose numbers have grown as enrollment has dropped dramatically. But it also raises questions about whether declining campuses should end up with significantly more funding per student even as their ability to offer a full range of programs diminishes.

“Increased investment in schools with fewer than 200 students can only prolong an inevitable decline in funding to levels that cannot support ever-smaller schools,” the report notes. “Since these schools largely serve students in need, it behooves New York public schools to find longer-term solutions to the growing number of small schools.”

Alex Zimmerman is a reporter for Chalkbeat New York, covering New York’s public schools. Contact Alex at azimmerman@chalkbeat.org.

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One Student’s Charitable Efforts Spread to Other Elementary Schools | News, Sports, Jobs https://agapesgr.org/one-students-charitable-efforts-spread-to-other-elementary-schools-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 10:08:50 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/one-students-charitable-efforts-spread-to-other-elementary-schools-news-sports-jobs/ AMSTERDAM — When Sofia Harrienger told her parents a few years ago that she wanted “make a donation” her birthday at the local animal shelter instead of getting presents, it came as a surprise. “She came up to us and said, I have enough stuff, can I just give my birthday,” remembers his […]]]>

AMSTERDAM — When Sofia Harrienger told her parents a few years ago that she wanted “make a donation” her birthday at the local animal shelter instead of getting presents, it came as a surprise.

“She came up to us and said, I have enough stuff, can I just give my birthday,” remembers his mother Lara Kulpa. She was only 7 years old at the time.

Since then, Harrienger has continued to collect donations to support area organizations on his birthday, and the effort has grown every year. Her family formed the non-profit Creating Hope Foundation when the new custom became an enduring tradition.

“When others feel good because of an action I’ve done, it makes me feel good.” said Harrienger, a fifth grader at Tecler Elementary School.

For his 10th birthday last month, Harrienger set a goal to raise $5,000 to support the Melodies Center at Albany Medical Center and families dealing with childhood cancer after seeing the care his own friend received there.

“My friend, he had cancer when he was five,” said Harrienger. “I liked the way they were doing things with him.”

Harrienger raised money for the cause by selling bottled water at garage sales and through an online art auction hosted by his family.

The fundraising initiative spread to area elementary schools that energized children after Greater Amsterdam School District administrators learned of the effort.

“We focus a lot on teaching students to become leaders here, Sofia is definitely a role model for that,” said Tecler director John Miller.

District Superintendent Richard Ruberti suggested holding a school-wide fundraising contest known as the Coin Wars. Students and staff donated coins to the effort in jars in each classroom, but the color of their coins was key to the contest.

Silver coins counted towards the total amount of funds raised, while copper coins counted towards the amount. Anyone could drop change into the copper jar in any classroom. The score with the highest total at the end would win a pizza night.

“Makes It Fun” said Ruberti. “The beauty is that all the money raised goes towards the whole goal.”

The competition was a hit with Harienger and his classmates. The children raided their family’s coin jars and urged their parents to get to the bank before school. Collected coins filled mason jars, tumblers and plastic bins.

“The whole school was so excited because she could help others and was a bit competitive between classes,” said Miller, who estimated the contributions raised easily weighed more than 100 pounds.

Tecler’s fourth-grade class won the coin war and the school raised $1,847 for the fight against childhood cancer. Donations from community members rounded the sum up to $2,000.

Over $2,500 in total was donated as part of the fundraising effort that was launched at Tecler, Marie Curie and McNulty elementary schools. With the money she had already raised, Harrienger was able to exceed her goal of $5,000.

“It was better than anyone had ever dreamed of” Kulpa said. “It was one thing for all of us to start it, but it was everyone else who was involved who really made it happen and we’re very grateful for that.”

Harrienger plans to use the surplus for his birthday fundraising effort next year to help more families battling cancer.

“The more I broadcast and inspire people, the more it’s going to go around and make more people happy,” said Harrienger. Although she will be entering middle school in the fall, vice-principal Robert Hisert suggested that Harrienger return to Tecler next year to talk to students about her fundraising efforts and continue hosting coin wars at Tecler. . School officials eagerly agreed.

“As a district, we continue to try to instill these values ​​in our students and families to give back as much as possible and to recognize the positive,” said Ruberti. “To be able to bring the community together with a 10-year-old doing it is amazing.”

“The world could use more Sofias,” he added. “I couldn’t be more proud of you.”



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LIV Golf shares its plans for 2023 as it prepares for the 14-event league https://agapesgr.org/liv-golf-shares-its-plans-for-2023-as-it-prepares-for-the-14-event-league/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 22:02:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/liv-golf-shares-its-plans-for-2023-as-it-prepares-for-the-14-event-league/ DORAL, Fla. — LIV Golf is banking on its team format. Ahead of Saturday’s semi-finals at its $50 million tag team championship, LIV Golf officials met with some members of the media to outline its plans for the future. The main talking points centered around the 12 teams. LIV says it is aiming for a […]]]>

DORAL, Fla. — LIV Golf is banking on its team format.

Ahead of Saturday’s semi-finals at its $50 million tag team championship, LIV Golf officials met with some members of the media to outline its plans for the future. The main talking points centered around the 12 teams.

LIV says it is aiming for a business model that would eventually be similar to that of other major team sports in the United States, such as the NFL, NBA, MLB and NHL, and officials hope the franchise of its teams will create a revenue stream that the upstart circuit solely funded by Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund does not currently have.

“Our belief is that it may not be the case from the start, but people understand team sports. They play team sports,” said LIV Golf COO, Atul Khosla: “Yes, they have a favorite player too, it’s no different than anywhere else, but it’s related to being associated with a team. We believe this trend may continue in golf as well.

“The concept that I understand is new to golf, but the inherent human nature of our aspect of wanting to associate with the team, it’s not.”

That said, if you can’t get behind Dustin Johnson’s 4Aces GC or Brooks Koepka’s Smash GC, LIV believes its individual elements of golfers playing their own ball, counting their own score, and winning individual prizes is enough.

Believe it or not, LIV wants to add to the professional golf scene and provide fans with a different form of entertainment. They certainly do the latter with no cuts, shotgun tee-off events that feature music throughout the tour and countless activities in its fan village in addition to on-course product.

Khosla said a successful 2023 — when the Tour transitions to the 14-event LIV Golf League — will see 12 established teams and brands, as well as one commercialized product.

“We have to get on TV, we have to have business partners,” he explained. “These are successful things that we need, they are sort of milestones that we have to achieve next year.”

Here are some other highlights from the presentation:

Calendar for 2023

LIV confirmed at its event earlier this summer at Trump National Bedminster that it will transition to the LIV Golf League in 2023 with 48 players across 12 team franchises playing a 14-event schedule in a bid to expand the golf’s footprint across North and Latin America, Asia, Australia, the Middle East and Europe.

Of the eight events this season, five were held in the United States, one in England, one in Thailand and one in Saudi Arabia. Expect LIV to hit golf-starved markets again in 2023, similar to its 2022 schedule which included stops near Portland, Boston and Chicago, as well as the home countries of some of its players, which would indicate potential stops in Australia, South Africa and England. With its Saudi support, expect another stopover in the Kingdom as well.

When these events will be played is also TBD. LIV wants nothing to do with the competition against the NFL, which indicates a late February start and a late September start. The league will also avoid facing the majors and also does not plan to hold any events the week before. LIV also wants to avoid so-called “legacy events,” such as the Genesis Invitational and the Arnold Palmer Invitational, which creates a tight schedule, especially with international travel. The series has done well with producing a slow stream of news between events, pointing to a planned November release.

New players… and a transfer window?

Khosla did not provide details on the number of new players likely to join the league, opting instead to ‘let player negotiations take place’. The goal is for teams to be locked down by the end of this year. Each team will also have a designated replacement in 2023, but only for injuries.

The most unique change when the league format takes shape will be a quasi-transfer market where players can move between teams within a certain time after the Tag Team Championship and before the start of the following season. . With a long four-month hiatus between the one-season finale and the upcoming season opener, a handful of free agent trades and moves could make for an interesting offseason.

Silver

Players will compete for $405 million in total prize money in 2023 and have other opportunities to earn money and compete in the Asian Tour International Series, where LIV expects players to compete in of “many” events. After all, LIV and the PIF committed $300 million for the Asian tour.

The 12 franchise teams will be 75% owned by LIV, with the remaining 25% owned by core players, which would include captains such as Dustin Johnson, Bryson DeChambeau, Phil Mickelson, and more. These franchises will also incur new costs in the coming 2023. of their team’s budget, such as a player’s annual payment, incentives, and general expenses, including travel and hiring of team personnel.

All in all, big changes are in store for 2023 that could alter the future of the league.

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Holland city council takes ‘major step’ towards building ice rink https://agapesgr.org/holland-city-council-takes-major-step-towards-building-ice-rink/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 10:04:31 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/holland-city-council-takes-major-step-towards-building-ice-rink/ HOLLAND – The city council of Holland took several important steps to inaugurate a dream ice rink during its meeting on Wednesday October 19. “It’s fun,” City Manager Keith Van Beek said. “We’ve been dreaming about this particular project…we’ve been imagining the location for this rink for years. I still remember talking about it probably […]]]>

HOLLAND – The city council of Holland took several important steps to inaugurate a dream ice rink during its meeting on Wednesday October 19.

“It’s fun,” City Manager Keith Van Beek said. “We’ve been dreaming about this particular project…we’ve been imagining the location for this rink for years. I still remember talking about it probably a few months after we started.

After:A Dutch teacher and long-time volunteer is ready to make his ice rink dream come true

After:Holland unveils design for community ice skating park

“We’re putting all the pieces together (with) the fundraising, getting the final construction drawings and really getting this to the point where we can turn the dirt around next year – that’s a major milestone in this element tonight, and We are pleased .”

A rendering of the future Window in the Waterfront ice rink in downtown Holland.  The city hopes to make the space a year-round convenience, with activities beyond the skating season.

During the meeting, the board approved an agreement with the Community Foundation of the Holland/Zeeland Area for the acceptance and administration of charitable funds to support the project, in addition to agreements with GMB Architecture and Engineering and GDK Construction .

“The vision you see in front of you is truly the dream of the community,” Deputy City Manager Matt VanDyken told the council. “Now we’re at a point where those dreams are coming true.”

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Trillions of Dollars Ride the ‘Silver Tsunami’ | Arkansas Business News https://agapesgr.org/trillions-of-dollars-ride-the-silver-tsunami-arkansas-business-news/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://agapesgr.org/trillions-of-dollars-ride-the-silver-tsunami-arkansas-business-news/ We were unable to send the item. As it reshaped the nation’s demographics, shopping habits and popular culture, America’s most influential generation is poised to transform retirement and generational wealth. Some 70 million aging baby boomers are poised to bequeath the greatest aggregation of assets and business interests ever accumulated, a phenomenon dubbed the “silver […]]]>

We were unable to send the item.

As it reshaped the nation’s demographics, shopping habits and popular culture, America’s most influential generation is poised to transform retirement and generational wealth.

Some 70 million aging baby boomers are poised to bequeath the greatest aggregation of assets and business interests ever accumulated, a phenomenon dubbed the “silver tsunami.” And Little Rock trust attorney Stan Miller says it’s even bigger than its name suggests.

“Over the next 25 years, between $60 trillion and $80 trillion will flow from the people who won it to the people who didn’t, for the most part,” said ILP+ partner Miller. McChain Miller Nissman. “What even sociologists haven’t understood is that this is a first in the history of humanity. There has never been a wealth transition on this scale, because once a few wealthy passed on their wealth, but there has never been such a general transition accumulation of wealth by so many people.

“When I’m feeling optimistic, that sounds pretty cool, because wealth can be transformational in terms of education, traveling and doing well,” Miller continued. “But on my scariest days, I think of a bunch of kids who might not be ready for those monies.”

Miller has seen first-hand damage, fortunes squandered on friends and bad investments, or consumed by addictions, and everyone knows lottery winners have spent millions in a few years. To avoid pitfalls, clients need to know their goals and advisors need to know their clients, wealth planners said.

“I ask clients about themselves, and I won’t look at a financial statement until I have the full story,” Miller said. “I want to know about spouse, parents, children, what kind of car you drive, where you go to church. Until I know who they are, I completely refuse to talk about money or assets.

William L. Kerst Jr. of Hot Springs and Henry Ford of Tennessee agreed, adding that more tools than ever are available to serve customer goals, as long as customers have thought deeply about what they want to achieve.

More positions, income

Baby boomers are expected to transfer $1.5 trillion to $3 trillion in assets and business value every five years by 2050, according to DD&F Consulting Group of Little Rock.

To keep up with the influx of customers, companies like Miller’s and Kerst’s Community First Trust of Hot Springs are adding employees, beefing up software and riding a growing wave of revenue.

It’s a business opportunity for advisers, but also a good time to remind the wealthy that death and taxes are indeed inevitable.

“The younger group of baby boomers, those born up to 1964, are beginning to put plans in place to transfer their wealth to their children,” said Kerst, who also heads the trust department of Farmers Bank & Trust of Magnolia. , which merged with Community First early last year. Community First remains the state’s only self-governing trust company.

“Some kids can handle the money, and you’ll see some families leave it to them, but some can’t,” Kerst said. “A lot more wealth is being placed in trusts, which translates into more wealth management and trust positions. (Kerst has 17 employees and is still going, he said.)

“We are also ensuring more money for more people, including those who let the wealth be distributed when the child reaches a certain age.”

Miller, following Kerst’s theme, said bequests “often leave some controls over the money for life, so the heirs are protected from evil influences. Wealth does have a dark side, and it can enable disruptive and addictive behavior. Keeping this in mind really guides my approach to estate planning.

Born roughly between 1946 and 1964, baby boomers left an outsized imprint on music, fashion, retail trends, and even America’s shift from farms and cities to car-dependent suburbs. .

They have also become the wealthiest generation in the country, and around 10,000 of its estimated 73 million surviving members are turning 65 every day. Many are working well into their 65s, but reflect a rapidly aging workforce; employers are expected to face a significant loss of skills and knowledge in the coming years.

“Instead of simple wills, people want a lively conversation of trust, a conversation that’s much more focused on outcomes,” Simmons said.

“People can put conditions in trusts that will require a beneficiary to go and convince the trustee that they really need the money and won’t waste it. The concept of an outright distribution is rare now.

Miller, a former Army officer who decided early on to go “deep” rather than broad, has devoted his entire practice to estate planning for more than 30 years.

He is also founder and principal of WealthCounsel LLC, a provider of document writing software, and author of “Your American Legacy,” which details his approach to estate planning.

WealthCounsel has thrived in serving the growing slice of retirees. “It just exploded, and after bringing the necessary technological solutions to the market, we have seen that our business is growing every year. There’s this aging population, this aggregation of wealth, and a growing recognition that giving a few million dollars to kids might actually be hurtful.

Kerst said First Community Trust has added employees and seen revenue grow even during the pandemic.

Success in succession

Business succession clients are also lining up. Business success doesn’t necessarily translate to succession skills, advisers said. “These people knew exactly what they wanted to do with their business, but in the end, they just pushed forward,” Miller said. “You actually need a planned succession, and you can’t do it overnight.”

Ford, who founded LifeSteps Financial in Claremont, Calif., and now practices in Tennessee, specializes in private business estates.

Henry Ford

“On the business owner side, we’re seeing major transitions into the next generation of one-person businesses,” Ford said, offering a national perspective. “Basically, baby boomers and Gen Xers, which I am, currently own 86% of all unlisted companies, so we’re talking about a massive transfer of corporate ownership.”

In Arkansas, many of these passed on businesses are farms.

“Farmers, like other businessmen, want their businesses to continue, but they can have four children and only one of them wants to farm,” Miller said. “The others left to become doctors, nurses or whatever. So we can suggest ways to pass the farm to the child who wants it while treating other children fairly. There is no cookie-cutter approach.

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